New Japan Tsunami Evacuation Report

Following the tragic 3.11 earthquake and tsunami in Japan, New Zealand’s GNS Science in collaboration with Washington State Emergency Management and other stakeholders set out to further analyze the successes of the evacuation and messaging approaches used in this event. A key element of this research was to investigate both traditional tsunami evacuation strategies used in communities, schools, etc. as well as non-traditional approaches, such as vertical evacuation techniques and draw parallels with the concepts being applied in New Zealand, Washington, and elsewhere in the United States. The report can be found here.

National Tsunami Preparedness Week

National Tsunami Preparedness Week began March 25, and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and Washington Emergency Management Division (WA-EMD) urge all citizens who live along coastlines to take the threat of tsunamis seriously.

In some communities, traditional evacuations are not always an option. FEMA led the development of a new approach to dealing with this challenge called Tsunami Vertical Evacuation. Watch the video on how to use this new approach. This video was developed by FEMA RiskMap, FEMA Region X, WA-EMD, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and the National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program (NTHMP).  Click here for Press Release.

It’s Beach Season in the Northwest: Are You Tsunami Ready?

After months of rain and gray skies, it’s time to pack up swimsuits and sunscreen and head to the Northwest coast. But beach visitors in our region need to prepare for more than sunshine. The Pacific coastline from northern California to British Columbia is at risk from a powerful offshore earthquake and resulting tsunami, events that are likely to cause many injuries, deaths and widespread property damage.

Coastal residents and visitors can reduce their risk from a tsunami simply by knowing when to get out of its path and how to reach safety.

What is the threat?

Tsunamis triggered by nearby earthquakes offshore, as well as distant tsunamis caused by earthquakes across the Pacific Ocean, have struck the Northwest coast. The source of the nearby quakes is the Cascadia subduction zone, which lies offshore from northern California to British Columbia. In this zone, two tectonic plates — the North America plate and the Juan de Fuca plate — come together to form an 800-mile long earthquake fault.

Scientists believe the most recent Cascadia subduction zone earthquake, a magnitude 9 event, occurred in January 1700. The best available evidence indicates that these earthquakes occur, on average, every 500 to 600 years. However, the years between these events have been as few as 100 to 300 years — meaning, all Cascadia residents, especially coastal residents and visitors, should prepare to experience a powerful and potentially damaging subduction zone earthquake in their lifetimes.

After a Cascadia subduction zone earthquake, a tsunami could arrive within 15 to 20 minutes, sending a series of massive waves crashing into the shoreline and flooding entire coastal communities.

How can beachgoers prepare?

Before you head to the coast, find out if your lodging and the places you will visit are in a tsunami evacuation zone. (Oregon and Washington residents can search for an address with this tsunami evacuation zone map viewer.) Once there, look for street signs or seek out evacuation maps that show local tsunami hazard zones and routes. It’s also a good idea to prepare personal disaster supply kits to take with you on any trip.

Signs of a tsunami

You may feel that a tsunami is on its way from the ground shaking that precedes it. Other signs include a sudden rise or fall in sea level or a loud roar like a jet aircraft. Once the shaking stops, move to higher ground or farther inland as quickly as possible. Do not wait for an official warning; a tsunami may arrive within minutes. Wait for emergency officials to issue the “All Clear” signal before returning to low-lying areas. Never try to watch a tsunami or surf a tsunami wave. Tsunamis travel faster than a person can run.

Should Northwest residents be worried about visiting the coast?

Be prepared, not worried. By knowing when and how to respond to a tsunami, residents can significantly reduce the risk to their loved ones and themselves.

More tsunami resources

CREW: Tsunami Mitigation and Preparedness in the Cascadia region

NOAA/National Weather Service Tsunami Ready Program

Oregon Tsunami Clearinghouse (evacuation maps and other resources)

Pacific Tsunami Warning Center

Surviving a Tsunami: Lessons from Chile, Hawaii and Japan (U.S. Geological Survey)

West Coast and Alaska Tsunami Warning Center

WSSPC Releases Tsunami Report

With support of CREW members, Western States Seismic Policy Council (WSSPC) has just completed and released a report in support of the accomplishments of the state tsunami programs and the important role they play in educating the public, especially for preparedness for a locally generated tsunami.

The report and press release can be found at: www.wsspc.org.

Vertical Evacuation Plans Could Save Thousands from Tsunamis, Studies Say

Two new federally-funded studies say vertical evacuation structures could save thousands of Washington coastal residents from deadly tsunami waves.

A series of specially constructed berms, towers, and buildings could save an estimated 24,750 residents and visitors in Pacific and Grays Harbor counties which have more than 120 miles of Pacific Ocean coastline lying only a short distance from the Cascadia Subduction Zone. Geologic studies have shown that the low-lying coastal zones of these counties have experienced Magnitude 9+ Cascadia earthquakes and tsunamis about every 300 to 500 years over the past 3,500 years.

Download PDF reports here: Greys Harbor Vertical Final, Pacific County Vertical Final